Two Kinds of Love

A great TED video for the weekend for every teacher or anyone who cares about education, and children's learning.

The two loves a teacher can bring to the classroom every day; their own love for the subject they're teaching and their love for the children.

Joe Ruhl in this great TED talk shows that many of the greatest strengths and skills a teacher can have are really not so very new.

Schools of Possibility and Hope

Moving Learning Forward

Here’s a great new TED talk that will particularly appeal to anyone who’s bought in to the ideas and concepts of growth mindset. Whilst the headline and the promotion of the video may be focused on adults who want to get ‘unstuck’ in making progress in the things that matter to them in their lives, I believe it also carries some important and valuable lessons for education.

When planning for lessons and supporting children’s learning, it’s vitally that educators have clarity in their intent about when an activity is geared to learning and acquiring knowledge or competency and when it’s designed for practice. Too often, there’s a muddy vagueness about which we’re trying to achieve and a belief that if they’re merged together there will be discernible progress.

This process can also be made more overt and transparent with the young learners – so that they understand at any point in time whether they’re engaged in a learning activity or a practice activity.

Will You Choose to Matter?

Seth Godin, extending on one of his ideas in the ‘Stop Stealing Dreams’ manifesto for education.

Can we create schools in which both educators and children are motivated to do work that matters – not just simply to ‘play the game’, go through the motions and give us what the system expects? Can we develop cultures and environments where more people have the desire to go beyond mere success, who don’t feel the need to apologise away their passion and who truly yearn to stretch to their limits to understand what is really possible for them?

Changing Our Approach to Work

After the business barons got out of hand exploiting their workers with unhealthily long work shifts in awful conditions, the 8-hour shift came as good news and was almost luxurious for many. It went on to become embedded in the mentality of working people having been fought for and hard won. There was a slogan used by the campaigners that went, “Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Rest, Eight Hours for What We Will!”

It’s held firm for a long time now, and been exported to every corner of the world. But, in so many ways it just plain doesn’t work any more. Here, this informative and entertaining article from Forbes highlights just some of those reasons – and suggests what could work so much more effectively for us.

Forbes – Why The 8-Hour Workday Doesn’t Work

While reading this I became aware of my own personal hangups that don’t make such changes easy. Early in my professional working life, it was the late 1980’s and i was working in a bank where there were a lot of very traditional and ‘set in their ways’ people. I had had many part time jobs during my student days and always worked hard. Here, suddenly, I was faced with an environment within which it was more important to be seen working and ‘busy’ than to actually get work done or achieve outcomes.

One of my biggest shocks was when i watched a senior gentleman who had just returned from his annual vacation labour for two whole days making lists of all the correspondence and work that had arrived on his desk during the two weeks he was away before he wrote a single letter in response or made a single phone call. It even troubled me that, in his absence, all work related to his clients was simply added to a growing pile on his desk. there was no comprehension that our responsibility was to meet needs of clients/ customers (and that a person’s holiday was an inadequate reason for them to go without service!)

There were time clocks in the office where each employee had to insert a plastic key that would then cause it to show how much time you had worked over the month. Some of the laziest and most unproductive people in the office used to show the highest numbers of hours at the end of every month! Figure that one out. There were all sorts of games and scams people could play. I really didn’t want to join in. In fact, far from playing the game, I got in to trouble after i’d been there about 6 months and to be spoken to sternly by the union representative. He informed me that it had been brought to his attention that I had been taking on ‘extra projects’ for managers and taking work home in the evenings and at weekends. This was to stop immediately!

I ignored the union rep and reminded him a few years later when I had been promoted a number of times and he still sat doing the same job as before. Nevertheless, the seeds had been sown at that time for my decision to strike out from my home country and head to the East, where attitudes to work and time tend to be rather different. i haven’t looked back really – in fact, this year I’ve moved further East!

I still suffer from guilt. We are all well aware of the ability for office workers to ‘guilt’ those who seem to be slacking if they have a personal or casual conversation in the workplace, or come a little later than others, regardless of work done, output achieved etc. I’ll even guilt myself for walking in half an hour after others, even though I know that I sat down and did two or three hours of great quality work that I’m proud of the evening before at home.

There’s one area where I do disagree with the advice in the Forbes article. I think when one is in the state of ‘Flow’ identified by Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi the need for breaks every hour melts away. Certainly, for me personally, the clock stops mattering when i’m in my groove like that. To force myself to take a break would actually be an annoyance, would break the flow and make me less productive. That doesn’t seem to make much sense to me.

It’s not just the time issue that needs major rethinking in our approaches to work. it’s also how we behave in our offices, how we organise them and how we make them places where people can actually get work of real quality done. These problems are well brought out in this TED talk;

Going back to my early working life, eventually i became a manager after a few years, in charge of an office with about 14 people working (or, I worried, too often not working), interrupting each other continuously. When i brought this up as an issue, people were shocked. I suggested a plan whereby anyone could put up a little flag at the front of their desk (we were entirely open plan). This flag meant, don’t interrupt this person. You couldn’t keep the flag for more than an hour at a time or for more than 2 hours in a single day. People didn’t like this. When the next ‘upward appraisal’ session came around they gave me a bad mark and complained i was making myself inaccessible. The truth was, it was vitally important to them to maintain the status quo. Concentrated, uninterrupted work time would mean we’d have to show some good work. Worse, it meant that you couldn’t impulsively go and stretch your legs whilst dumping some ‘upward delegation’ on your boss.

I’m writing this in the evening, sitting in my home with beautiful classical music playing in the background – Bach, if anyone’s interested. I worked at home all day today and didn’t even leave the house. I got real work done. Work that was important and matters. And, I probably achieved more in my work today than I had in the last week. i didn’t watch TV or waste my time. I did do some exercises and take a shower in the afternoon when I felt my work flagging. That left me ‘good to go’ for a few more hours afterwards.

So, why do i feel guilty?

 

If Kids Grow Vegetables, They Eat Vegetables

A great TED presentation from the self declared ‘Guerrilla Gardener’.

An entertaining perspective on how we use urban spaces, who owns them and who has rights to use them. This guy’s certainly a rebel with a cause – and a good one. Urban living doesn’t mean that we should become disconnected from the land.

I loved his thoughts linking healthy diets for children with a sense of connection with the growing process. I’ve seen plenty of evidence that when children are engaged in the process of growing things they don’t lack for energy, enthusiasm or interest. Further, they start to see the issues of the environment and food differently.

What Great leaders Do

Today, I wanted to share one of my all time favourite TEd talks. Given over six years ago by Simon Sinek I believed right from when I first saw it that it has some enormously powerful thoughts for those of us who choose to lead in the education field.

The focus on ‘why’ we do what we do, the ‘why’ of our schools isn’t always easy or comfortable. When we bring this question out in to the open for full examination we can quickly find that there are conflicts. Some have visions that are about developing children holistically, regardless of background so that each cn fulfil their potential. Others believe the why is simply to have students pass exams, get in to ‘good’ colleges, etc. Others believe the primary reason they work in education is children won’t challenge them in the way adults will! others want to make a profit from something ‘solid and safe’. Still others want a job that fits conveniently with their home, family and what they perceive to be more important aspects of their life.

Not surfacing these conflicts will never be the answer. this leads to mediocre schools, leaders who have to micro manage instead of lead and end outcomes that will never live up to the potential.

As Sinek highlights, only when the leaders are open, transparent and clear (in other words they’ve worked out and enunciated) the ‘why’ of their school/ organisation then they can recruit for attracting those people who share that common vision. The more you can do that, the greater the synergistic strengths that will see the school really deliver on that vision.

Belief in a common, shared ‘why’ motivates teachers and staff, students and parents. Conflicts and difficulties, when they arise, can be dealt with better as there is common understanding of what are the end goals. People are inspired, motivated and willingly give of their best, to the benefit and growth of all.

Once we have a clearly articulated ‘why’, we have to be ready to root out any ‘what’ that is inconsistent or not congruent. Working from the inside out in this way makes that possible and shapes future decision making as all actions must be congruent and people are not inclined to do things that go against that why.