10 Virtues For the Modern Age

Well worth 4 minutes of anyone's time. Striving for these ten virtues enables us to be a better person - and that's likely to be in our best interest as well as everyone else's.

The School of Life

The school of Life Website

As the video above highlights, our education for children is all too often lacking in attention to the key skills of living - the skills that can enable a person to do more than just exist or muddle along.

School of Life sets out to provide lots of interesting and well presented material to fill that gap. The website link above will give you access to lots of videos, articles and even items available to purchase. Appropriate selection can yield lots of learning material for the school classroom.

Raising Children in the ‘Post Truth’ World

post-truth-world-p1

post-truth-world-p2

Here is an article that I wrote that was published in the January edition of Ipoh Valley of Dreams. I was provoked to write it in response to more and more media comments about the world we’re living in and the nature of politics in the world.

I found myself very conscious of the impact all this can potentially have on children and young people, growing up confronted by all this.

When Smart People Speak ……

Simon Sinek first crossed my radar a couple of years ago with an excellent and very popular TED talk. Since then i've followed his work with a lot of interest, because i feel he's one really smart guy and we should be taking note of the things he says.

So, I was delighted when a friend shared this video of an interview he gave recently. In it, i believe he sums up so well some critical aspects of the world we're living in today, and particularly the life experiences of so many 'millennials'.

The video has struck such a chord with so many, that Sinek has produced a further short video in which he elaborates a little more about how he came to take an interest in these issues. He also responds to some of the feedback that came his way after the initial interview.

Sinek’s work has predominantly been about leadership and organisations. As he points out, how to manage and lead millennials is now a significant issue in leadership. It does no good to simply condemn how they are, to criticize or to belittle. Millennials, as much as any generation before them are a product of the culture and environment they’ve grown up in.

I believe this is of way more than mere curious interest to us as educators. Firstly, there’s now a fair proportion of the teachers in our schools who are millennials. We need to understand how to lead them, motivate them, keep them and ensure that they are engaged and passionately committed to their work.

Secondly, I was especially struck by Sinek’s comment about how leaders cannot shrug off their responsibility to deal with the challenges associated with millennials. It’s no good to simply blame parents, earlier educators or the millennials themselves. So, we have to understand that if lack of quality parenting, or over-protective cossetting parenting is still influencing the lives of the children in our schools, then we have to figure out how to work with them. We need to help them to develop the skills pertaining to relationships, empathy for others, determining and recognising the importance of life meaning and purpose. Sinek’s arguments are valid, important and we need to be discussing our responses in schools.

Finally, here, I share the link to Simon Sinek’s website that carries more articles, resources and links to his other work:
Simon Sinek – Start With Why

Helping Children Build Empathy & The Growth Mindset

In the past, I have to admit fully that I've been somewhat critical of Classdojo for their app used by some school teachers for classroom management (classroom manipulation?) However, in recent months i believe that the people at classdojo have hit on a winner with their short series of videos based on the experiences of the monster Mojo.

They started out tackling Growth Mindset, working alongside experts of Stanford University making a series of short videos based upon the engaging little monster Mojo. These are designed for teachers to use with children, are engaging, attention grabbing and really quite thought-provoking.

Now, as this article highlights, they've built on that success by working with experts from Harvard Graduate School of Education on empathy. The principle behind these initiatives is that if there is promising research and ideas on skills development in the social-emotional domain, such vehicles can enable swift transfer to the learning environment to benefit teachers and pupils.

Huffington Post - Empathy Videos

The Growth Mindset video series hthey've gone on to work further with the team from Stanford on a new series on Perseverance. The first has just been issued, with two further episodes to follow over the next couple of weeks.

All three sets of videos, accompanied by discussion questions that can be used in class, can be found here;

ClassDojo - Big Ideas

There is a wealth of evidence that the development of strong social-emotional skills early in school life have a big impact in improving behaviour in school, interpersonal relationships, but also benefit academic performance from an early stage. I personally think these videos would make a great added resource for classes using Jenny Mosely's 'Quality Circle Time' principles to explore and address issues of how children behave, regulate their personal relations and develop strength as social beings.

And, the earlier children embark on such learning the greater their potential to build strengths that will be vital as they grow and valuable in their adult life.

The Narcissism of Selfies

I think most of us intuitively know that the near obsessive selfie-taking habits of many youngsters today is far from healthy. However, here’s a writer who sums up the problems with it very neatly;

New York Times Blogs – Well – Is Selfie Culture Making Our Kids Selfish?

Dr Michele Borba has just published her 23rd book, this one particularly exploring the unintended aspects of the selfie culture and what it’s doing to children. In this interview promoting the book she makes some excellent points about the impairment of emotional signal reading when children are having an increasing proportion of their human interaction online where they don’t get to see, read and interpret body language and other non-verbal cues.

She highlights the loss of empathy and caring for others when things become ‘all about me’, when narcissism and the desire to be centre of attention is at the forefront of a child’s actions and their thinking.

Finally, she makes a very strong case for emphasizing kindness and, maybe more important – building the child’s belief that – “I’m a kind person.”

Quest To Build The Perfect Team

Google set out to conduct a vast meta-analysis of what works (and what doesn’t) to create the best teams, figuring that as more and more of people’s work involves collaboration with others, it is critical to increase the likelihood of teams being successful.

This New York Times article is fascinating for the insights in to how they went about it, and what they discovered.

New York Times – What Google Learned From Its Quest To Build The Perfect Team

As the article mentions, teams are a critical part of how modern schools work and as leaders we are always seeking more effective ways for teams to harness different people’s capabilities to enhance the overall leaning experience for students. Teams are also a vital part of how the leadership of a school ensures that all parts work effectively with each other and make effective use of resources, space and time.

I also found it fascinating to read the piece from the perspective of how we are preparing children for their future roles as team members in companies and organisations. From this perspective it was disturbing as I felt that still way too little of what’s happening is really geared to enabling students to build the critical skills necessary.

What the article identifies, very clearly, is that for people to function effectively in teams (and for those teams to be effective) empathy, sensitivity to the feelings and needs of fellow team members are critical. Children will not grow up with high levels of these skills if talked at endlessly by teachers in pursuit of standardised test scores, or playing endless hours of computer games and watching youtube videos!