Childism at the Tate

Here’s a great article written by a great friend, Dr Sue Lyle, educator from Wales, UK. I would urge parents and teachers to read it with an open mind, maybe a couple of times.

Blogger Post – Childism at the Tate

It’s deeply insightful in its own right as an examination of the actions and motivations of a teacher whilst interacting with a class of students on a field trip. However, I believe it also offers thoughtful contemplation on how much or how little attention we may pay to our interactions with children, the methods we use to communicate with them and what those say about the reality of their rights.

Violence in the Home

Two recent cases that have come to light in the American media shed a fascinating light on something about the society as a whole. One is a case of a sportsman assaulting his wife. Here, there’s little sympathy for the man and condemnation of those who may have attempted to brush his wrongdoing under the carpet.

The other also concerns a sportsman, but he’s been charged with causing injury to his son when assaulting him with a switch. Here, the condemnation is far more muted with media articles pointing out that corporal punishment for one’s own child is legal in almost every American state.

Is the underlying message that physical force is still acceptable in society where there is a relationship that is unequal – for the powerful to use force over the weak? Therefore, the only reason for stopping domestic violence against women is that they are no longer to be treated as weak, but equal.

Isn’t there now enormous evidence that children brought up to believe that physical force is used in the home to exert power equations and to get things done “your way” have a greater likelihood of growing up to people who use violent force on other family members as adults?

People campaign hard enough to prevent abuse and violence towards animals and pets in the home. Do they care more about protecting defenseless animals than defenseless children because somehow there’s a historical hangover that a parent has propietory rights over their child?

Domestic violence of any description is not a person’s private business. We must be ready to condemn it in all its forms.

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