Permission To Be Human

Teachers are humans too!

As professionals an awful lot of teachers want to believe that they are objective, detached and that their thinking about every child in their care is shaped by professional considerations based upon pedagogy, all their training and learning and the desire to support every child to fulfil their potential.

Ahem! Reality check!

Let’s get real teachers. We’re no more or less subjective in the way that our minds work than other mature adults.

Here’s one way that we’ve all either done or certainly heard teachers doing in staff rooms (or might I say even Principals and leadership team members in management meetings! (Shock, horror!)

The Danger of Teacher Nostalgia – Cult of Pedagogy

Another example comes from my reading a few years ago. I wish I could remember or find the source for this. Apparently, there was a training programme going on for a group of around 30 teachers in a Scandinavian country. The teachers were asked to come up with a collective definition of ‘naughtiness’ in a classroom – what constituted bad behaviour? After arriving at a shared definition they were asked to think about who was the naughtiest child in their current class, to write the child’s name on a piece of paper and put it in an envelope.

Then, over the course of a couple of months their classes were monitored and analysed with video and other tools in great detail and all acts by children that fell within the shared definition of naughtiness were noted and recorded. In this way, they were able to rank the children in all the classes for the extent of their naughty behaviour.

So, the the million dollar question – how many of the teachers had the same name in their envelope as appeared at the top of the observed naughtiness lists?

10%, 25%, 50%?

Exactly none of them, 0% had a match in the children’s names.

The researchers concluded that innate subjectivity of teachers and their own personalities mean that some children’s ways of misbehaving were more noticeable and memorable than others. In short, the teachers were nothing like as objective as they thought they were (or wanted to believe they were).

This leads to two critical questions;

a) Does this level of subjectivity matter?
b) If so, what can teachers do about it?

In my view, absolutely this matters and has potential risks that some children are going to get their education potential hampered by the subjective clashes with individual teachers. As to the solution, I believe one of the most valuable tools for a teacher to get more objective is daily journaling – a regular habit in which the teacher records simply the facts of what happened in their classroom, wherever possible avoiding applying their emotions and feelings to it. Regular review of these journal records can enable the teacher to get a more holistic and objective perception of what’s really happening, class dynamics and how their own personality and those of the children are interacting.

For some teachers this may sound like a big investment of time and effort. However, I believe if the habit is built solidly it’s a task that can be carried out quite quickly. The biggest payoff comes at report writing time and the time of parent teacher meetings. All that objectively gathered data enables far better reports to be written in far less time.

Incidentally, i believe this also applies to leaders and the people they work with in terms of being objective about performance and development. Again, the payoff comes at the time of appraisals and performance management feedback sessions. For that, another day, another blog post.

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