Feedback in the Professional Learning Environment

The best schools are communities of learners, with the school Head fulfilling the role of ‘Head Learner’. The learning done by educators needs to be on a number of levels and benefits from being visible and transparent (students who see their teacher as a learner develop healthier, more positive attitudes to their own learning).

Whilst some of the learning comes from books, academic resources, training courses, conferences etc. there’s also a vital component that comes from growing self-awareness combined with tapping in to the knowledge and insights of colleagues. This requires a healthy climate for giving and receiving feedback and ‘open’ classrooms.

Traditionally, there was too often a culture of closed classrooms based on the idea that the classroom was the domain of the teacher, private and that school, leaders and peers had no right to intrude or interfere. However, one inevitable consequence of such attitudes was a lack of congruence or consistency of teaching in the school as a whole – each teacher ploughing their own furrow in their own chosen direction. It also meant that teachers weren’t learning from teachers – and that was a shame.

I have seen some awful situations where classroom observation was only carried out by members of the leadership team – and that too by accessing CCTV cameras in the classroom (so the teacher didn’t even know when they were being observed). This has nothing to do with growth, learning or leadership and everything to do with management, control and deep mistrust.

As trust builds between teachers and they get more used to being exposed to the observation of their peers in the classroom, the next significant step if the process is to offer real value is that the observer and the observed have to be both willing and able to engage in an effective process of feedback. Just sitting through 40 minutes of somebody’s class to tell them after, “Everything was nice,” is to do the courageous teacher who wants to learn a great disservice. However, equally, the delivery of feedback in ineffective ways can also leave teachers feeling hurt and disinclined to engage fully in such a process in future.

Therefore, i thought this little short video of ideas from 12 Manage offers a good starting list of perils to avoid in the giving of feedback;

12 Manage – 10 Common Mistakes in Giving Feedback:

The potential benefits are considerable. It's an area where we can all learn and grow, to reach mastery levels. In this way, trust in the process grows, teachers become more ready to open up and engage in two way processes. They also grow in confidence when it comes to revealing that they are learners and can benefit from the process. Win-win all around.

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